The Data on This iPad Will Self-destruct in 10 seconds…

The Data on This iPad Will Self-destruct in 10 seconds…
If you’re over thirty, then you probably remember watching the self-destructing laptop in the movie Mission Impossible. A small explosive would detonate inside the laptop and destroy the team’s orders after they had been viewed, thereby preventing the bad guys from getting them.Enter the iPad, which features a similar, albeit less Hollywood-like, self-destruct (data wipe) option in case your “magical device” ever falls into the wrong hands. You can turn on a feature under the passcode lock settings that will wipe all user data off of the iPad if the incorrect unlock passcode PIN is entered more than ten times.Since the PIN number is only four numeric digits long, there are only 10,000 possible PIN combinations available. A thief with a lot of time on his hands would eventually guess the correct four numbers after several hours.The main downside to this feature is if you have kids who want to try to use daddy or mommy’s iPad. They might enter the wrong PIN number one too many times before they finally ask you what it is. Use this feature at your own risk. It is recommend that you back up your iPad prior to using this feature and often if you have children in the house.To enable this feature:Touch the “Settings” icon on the iPad home screen.Choose “General” and touch “Passcode Lock.”Enter the PIN number to go into the “Passcode Lock” settings page.Move the “Erase Data” switch to the “ON” position. You will see the text below the “Erase Data” switch explaining that the feature will “Erase all data on this iPad after ten failed passcode attempts.”
This feature is available on the iPhone and iPod Touch as well. This blog entry will self-destruct in 30 seconds…The Data on This iPad Will Self-destruct in 10 seconds… originally appeared on About.com Internet / Network Security on Thursday, November 4th, 2010 at 21:39:51.Permalink | Comment | Email this[Lees verder]

Reporting Internet-related Fraud / Crimes
Phishing and other Internet-related scams are always coming at us from every angle: texts, e-mails, automated phone calls in the middle of the night. Many people simply ignore them, while others fall victim to them, but few people report them. A lot of folks are probably too embarrassed to report them to anyone because they feel they were dumb to have fallen for a scam. There are agencies that want to hear from you whether you are a victim or were close to becoming one. The Internet Crime Complaint Center is a partnership between the Federal Bureau of Investigation and the National White Collar Crime Center.The ICCC was established to receive complaints regarding Internet-related crimes and to track and refer those complaints to the appropriate government agency, foreign or domestic. They handle a wide range of crimes including identity theft, computer intrusion, online extortion, auction fraud, and phishing scams. Their website has a useful database of types of online fraud and tips on how to protect yourself. If you’ve been victimized online, you can visit their site and fill out a formal complaint to get the ball rolling.

Related Links:Protect Yourself From Phishing and Spam AttacksReporting Internet-related Fraud / Crimes originally appeared on About.com Internet / Network Security on Thursday, November 4th, 2010 at 17:49:05.Permalink | Comment | Email this[Lees verder]

Is Your Password Strong Enough to Not Get Cracked?
Eight? Nine? Fifteen characters? How long is long enough when it comes to making a strong password?According to Richard Boyd of the Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI), 8-character passwords “are inadequate.” He recommends using at least 12 characters and advises against using words, birthdays, and other patterns.Password cracking tools have become more sophisticated over the years and can leverage the increasing computing power provided by today’s faster processors.How can you protect yourself? Make a longer and stronger password. Here are some tips to help you create a strong password that should be difficult to crack:Make your password at least 12 to 15 characters in lengthUse at least 2 upper-case and 2 lower-case lettersUse at least 2 numbersUse at least 2 special characters, but avoid the common ones: !@#$Avoid using keyboard patternsAvoid using initials or birthdaysAvoid using whole wordsBe as random as possibleIs Your Password Strong Enough to Not Get Cracked? originally appeared on About.com Internet / Network Security on Saturday, September 11th, 2010 at 23:19:32.Permalink | Comment | Email this[Lees verder]

Is IT Security the Last Offshore “Outsource-Proof” IT Career Field?
If you’re trying to pick an IT specialty, but are afraid that your job will be outsourced to another country, consider IT Security as a career choice. It may be the last and only field left that is unlikely to be outsourced to offshore labor.According to OffShoreITOutsourcing.com, The IT market is the most active area of offshore outsourcing, accounting for 28% of the total activity for the outsourcing market.Coding, Network Administration, Helpdesk Support, and other IT career fields have already seen major increases in offshore outsourcing. Services such as ELance and oDesk provide a huge market for skilled foreign programmers who will often work for extremely low pay compared to what their American counterparts are willing to accept.

So why is IT Security potentially outsource-proof?
US Security Clearance Cannot be Obtained by Foreign Nationals. The Department of Defense may have employees who are foreign nationals, but it is highly unlikely that they will be able to obtain security clearance required for working on projects related to DoD IT Security.Security is Considered an Internal Matter and Often Requires On-site Support.  While some remote management and helpdesk tasks are outsourced, a lot of companies don’t want to provide remote access to sensitive systems. Also, computer forensics and physical security require an on-site security person.Fear of Data Theft and Stealing of Corporate Secrets.  Most companies don’t want their corporate data assets managed by someone that is not internal to their organization, regardless of whether they are honest and reputable. It is also more difficult to prosecute foreigners if any wrongdoing occurs because of extradition laws, jurisdiction, and other legal issues associated with foreign labor.Is IT Security the Last Offshore “Outsource-Proof” IT Career Field? originally appeared on About.com Internet / Network Security on Saturday, September 11th, 2010 at 23:15:39.Permalink | Comment | Email this[Lees verder]

Are Out-of-office Auto-reply Emails a Security Risk?
You might want to think twice before you write your next out-of-office reply message because you never know who might receive it and what they might do with the information it contains. The information you provide in your automated reply might help a criminal impersonate you, track you down, or even know the best time to rob your house.
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Here’s a typical reply I see a lot: “I will be out of the office from September 10-15th at the XYZ IT conference in Cleveland, Ohio. If you need to reach me, you can call me on my cell at 555-1212. Please contact my supervisor, John Smith, at 555-1234 for any major issues.”
To a criminal, the above reply is a treasure trove of useful information. You’ve just given them your location, the duration of your absence, your contact information, your supervisor’s location (he is obviously not at the conference with you), your chain-of-command, and your line of work (since you said you were at an IT conference). Here are some things a criminal could do with the information you provided in your out-of-office reply:
Steal your property or harm your family. The recipient of your auto-reply now knows that you are out of town and exactly how long you will be gone. All he or she needs now is your home address and a windowless van.Steal your identity or impersonate you. The information in your auto-reply, such as your supervisor’s name, cell number, and your location, all aid the criminal. An identity thief could use freely available search tools on the Internet to piece together the rest of the information he or she needs to assume your identity. Since you are out of town, it’s apparent your boss won’t easily be able to transfer a call to you. The identity thief could call your boss and use a work-related pretext or social engineering attack to gather even more sensitive information about you:Identity Thief:”Hi, this is Bob from accounting. I need Joe’s employee ID and Social Security number because of an issue with his timecard.”Joe’s Boss: “Joe’s out of town at a conference. Let me pull that info up for you.”
The best practice is to avoid using the out-of-office auto-reply at all. Skip the auto-reply, call your important customers and family, and let them know how to reach you.  If you feel you must use an auto-reply, be extremely vague in your language. State that you will be “unavailable,” which will provide uncertainty as to whether you are out of town or just in a long (local) meeting. Remove your signature block and avoid providing any personally identifying information.

Follow these useful tips so you don’t return from your IT conference only to find all your belongings have been stolen.Are Out-of-office Auto-reply Emails a Security Risk? originally appeared on About.com Internet / Network Security on Saturday, September 11th, 2010 at 23:08:41.Permalink | Comment | Email this[Lees verder]

Avoid New Spam / Phishing Attacks
There are a couple of new spam / phishing attacks which have been successful at circumventing my Junkmail filter and making it to my Inbox. One is titled ‘Statement Request’ and the other is titled ‘Microsoft has released an update for Microsoft Outlook’ or sometimes ‘Critical Update for Microsoft Outlook’. To me, these are obvious spam or phishing emails that I barely even think about before deleting them and moving on. But, the volume of them that has been hitting my Inbox has led me to examine them in more detail to help you understand how to recognize them as threats and avoid becoming a victim.’Statement Request’ spam’Microsoft has released an update for Microsoft Outlook’ spamAvoid New Spam / Phishing Attacks originally appeared on About.com Internet / Network Security on Wednesday, June 24th, 2009 at 09:32:07.Permalink | Comment | Email this[Lees verder]

Microsoft Releases Beta of New Security Software
Microsoft announced last November that they planned to discontinue their retail Windows Live OneCare security product and replace it with a new free antimalware offering. That time has come. Well, its coming soon. Microsoft just released the Beta of their new Microsoft Security Essentials software.
Aimed at the consumer market, Microsoft Security Essentials leverages the research and resources of the Microsoft Malware Protection Center to identify and block viruses, spyware, and other malicious threats in real-time. It does not replace some of the other functionality of Windows Live OneCare such as defragmenting hard drives or backing up data, but it promises industry leading malware protection at a price that is hard to ignore in this economy- free.
You can get a copy of the Beta version by visiting the Microsoft Security Essentials site. I have downloaded my copy and will post a review of the product in the coming weeks. Microsoft Releases Beta of New Security Software originally appeared on About.com Internet / Network Security on Wednesday, June 24th, 2009 at 01:55:39.Permalink | Comment | Email this[Lees verder]

iPhone 3.0 Filled with Security Updates
Do you have an iPhone? Have you downloaded version 3.0 of the iPhone OS (the real thing- not the leaked pirated version with the malware)? I mentioned in the comments to my post earlier this week about the leaked iPhone 3.0 scam that I didn’t really understand what the rush was. It seemed like everyone *had* to have the update at precisely 1pm eastern. Not having an iPhone, I couldn’t figure out why you couldn’t wait an hour, or a day, or whatever and just download the update when it is convenient.
But, now it has been a few days and it seems safe to say that if you have an iPhone you probably should have acquired the 3.0 update by now. If the copy & paste feature isn’t a compelling enough reason, consider that there are almost 50 security updates included in version 3.0. The security updates apply to a broad range of features and functions of the iPhone. Its a virtual guarantee that at least some of them will have some relevance to you. iPhone 3.0 Filled with Security Updates originally appeared on About.com Internet / Network Security on Friday, June 19th, 2009 at 10:35:12.Permalink | Comment | Email this[Lees verder]

Asus + Disney + Toys R Us = Kid-Safe Netbook
Asus and Disney are teaming up to create the Disney Netpal. The Disney Netpal will be available in two models- the MK90 with a 16Gb solid state drive, and the MK90H with a 160Gb hard drive- and will only be available from Toys R Us and Amazon.com for a suggested retail price of $349.99. Both models will come in either ‘Princess Pink’ or ‘Magic Blue’, following the stereotypical gender color coding. The target market for the Disney Netpal is boys and girls age 6 to 12.
The next logical question is ‘why would I spend $100 more than a comparable netbook that isn’t branded by Disney?’. The answer is that Asus and Disney have worked to make the netbook safer for kids. First, it has a reinforced case and design to make it more ‘kid-proof’ from a physical perspective. Second, it is designed with a unique Disney user interface (built on Windows XP) with more than 40 parental control options.
According to this ZDNet article, “the systemÂ’s Disney browser is preloaded with numerous kid-friendly Disney websites for kids to explore, and the 2D “gadget tray” (think Windows taskbar, or OS X dock) displays visual icons for easy access to applications. ThereÂ’s also a collection of 15 widgets, including a stopwatch, a digital memo pad and a calculator.”| Follow me on Twitter| Newsletter Signup| Netsecurity Forum|Asus + Disney + Toys R Us = Kid-Safe Netbook originally appeared on About.com Internet / Network Security on Wednesday, June 17th, 2009 at 09:33:11.Permalink | Comment | Email this[Lees verder]

Leaked iPhone 3.0 Scam
Ain’t nothing like the real thing baby. And, since the real thing is officially released today do yourself a favor and don’t fall for any messages claiming to lead to a leaked download of the latest iPhone update.
Apple is releasing the iPhone 3.0 update today which adds copy & paste functionality and some other features to the popular mobile device. Scammers have started a multi-pronged attack involving Twitter, file sharing services, and affiliate marketing schemes capitalizing on the popularity of the iPhone and the excitement about the 3.0 release of the iPhone OS. | Follow me on Twitter| Newsletter Signup| Netsecurity Forum|Leaked iPhone 3.0 Scam originally appeared on About.com Internet / Network Security on Wednesday, June 17th, 2009 at 08:14:33.Permalink | Comment | Email this[Lees verder]

The Data on This iPad Will Self-destruct in 10 seconds…
If you’re over thirty, then you probably remember watching the self-destructing laptop in the movie Mission Impossible. A small explosive would detonate inside the laptop and destroy the team’s orders after they had been viewed, thereby preventing the bad guys from getting them.Enter the iPad, which features a similar, albeit less Hollywood-like, self-destruct (data wipe) option in case your “magical device” ever falls into the wrong hands. You can turn on a feature under the passcode lock settings that will wipe all user data off of the iPad if the incorrect unlock passcode PIN is entered more than ten times.Since the PIN number is only four numeric digits long, there are only 10,000 possible PIN combinations available. A thief with a lot of time on his hands would eventually guess the correct four numbers after several hours.The main downside to this feature is if you have kids who want to try to use daddy or mommy’s iPad. They might enter the wrong PIN number one too many times before they finally ask you what it is. Use this feature at your own risk. It is recommend that you back up your iPad prior to using this feature and often if you have children in the house.To enable this feature:Touch the “Settings” icon on the iPad home screen.Choose “General” and touch “Passcode Lock.”Enter the PIN number to go into the “Passcode Lock” settings page.Move the “Erase Data” switch to the “ON” position. You will see the text below the “Erase Data” switch explaining that the feature will “Erase all data on this iPad after ten failed passcode attempts.”
This feature is available on the iPhone and iPod Touch as well. This blog entry will self-destruct in 30 seconds…The Data on This iPad Will Self-destruct in 10 seconds… originally appeared on About.com Internet / Network Security on Thursday, November 4th, 2010 at 21:39:51.Permalink | Comment | Email this[Lees verder]

Reporting Internet-related Fraud / Crimes
Phishing and other Internet-related scams are always coming at us from every angle: texts, e-mails, automated phone calls in the middle of the night. Many people simply ignore them, while others fall victim to them, but few people report them. A lot of folks are probably too embarrassed to report them to anyone because they feel they were dumb to have fallen for a scam. There are agencies that want to hear from you whether you are a victim or were close to becoming one. The Internet Crime Complaint Center is a partnership between the Federal Bureau of Investigation and the National White Collar Crime Center.The ICCC was established to receive complaints regarding Internet-related crimes and to track and refer those complaints to the appropriate government agency, foreign or domestic. They handle a wide range of crimes including identity theft, computer intrusion, online extortion, auction fraud, and phishing scams. Their website has a useful database of types of online fraud and tips on how to protect yourself. If you’ve been victimized online, you can visit their site and fill out a formal complaint to get the ball rolling.

Related Links:Protect Yourself From Phishing and Spam AttacksReporting Internet-related Fraud / Crimes originally appeared on About.com Internet / Network Security on Thursday, November 4th, 2010 at 17:49:05.Permalink | Comment | Email this[Lees verder]

Is Your Password Strong Enough to Not Get Cracked?
Eight? Nine? Fifteen characters? How long is long enough when it comes to making a strong password?According to Richard Boyd of the Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI), 8-character passwords “are inadequate.” He recommends using at least 12 characters and advises against using words, birthdays, and other patterns.Password cracking tools have become more sophisticated over the years and can leverage the increasing computing power provided by today’s faster processors.How can you protect yourself? Make a longer and stronger password. Here are some tips to help you create a strong password that should be difficult to crack:Make your password at least 12 to 15 characters in lengthUse at least 2 upper-case and 2 lower-case lettersUse at least 2 numbersUse at least 2 special characters, but avoid the common ones: !@#$Avoid using keyboard patternsAvoid using initials or birthdaysAvoid using whole wordsBe as random as possibleIs Your Password Strong Enough to Not Get Cracked? originally appeared on About.com Internet / Network Security on Saturday, September 11th, 2010 at 23:19:32.Permalink | Comment | Email this[Lees verder]

Is IT Security the Last Offshore “Outsource-Proof” IT Career Field?
If you’re trying to pick an IT specialty, but are afraid that your job will be outsourced to another country, consider IT Security as a career choice. It may be the last and only field left that is unlikely to be outsourced to offshore labor.According to OffShoreITOutsourcing.com, The IT market is the most active area of offshore outsourcing, accounting for 28% of the total activity for the outsourcing market.Coding, Network Administration, Helpdesk Support, and other IT career fields have already seen major increases in offshore outsourcing. Services such as ELance and oDesk provide a huge market for skilled foreign programmers who will often work for extremely low pay compared to what their American counterparts are willing to accept.

So why is IT Security potentially outsource-proof?
US Security Clearance Cannot be Obtained by Foreign Nationals. The Department of Defense may have employees who are foreign nationals, but it is highly unlikely that they will be able to obtain security clearance required for working on projects related to DoD IT Security.Security is Considered an Internal Matter and Often Requires On-site Support.  While some remote management and helpdesk tasks are outsourced, a lot of companies don’t want to provide remote access to sensitive systems. Also, computer forensics and physical security require an on-site security person.Fear of Data Theft and Stealing of Corporate Secrets.  Most companies don’t want their corporate data assets managed by someone that is not internal to their organization, regardless of whether they are honest and reputable. It is also more difficult to prosecute foreigners if any wrongdoing occurs because of extradition laws, jurisdiction, and other legal issues associated with foreign labor.Is IT Security the Last Offshore “Outsource-Proof” IT Career Field? originally appeared on About.com Internet / Network Security on Saturday, September 11th, 2010 at 23:15:39.Permalink | Comment | Email this[Lees verder]

Are Out-of-office Auto-reply Emails a Security Risk?
You might want to think twice before you write your next out-of-office reply message because you never know who might receive it and what they might do with the information it contains. The information you provide in your automated reply might help a criminal impersonate you, track you down, or even know the best time to rob your house.
</p

Here’s a typical reply I see a lot: “I will be out of the office from September 10-15th at the XYZ IT conference in Cleveland, Ohio. If you need to reach me, you can call me on my cell at 555-1212. Please contact my supervisor, John Smith, at 555-1234 for any major issues.”
To a criminal, the above reply is a treasure trove of useful information. You’ve just given them your location, the duration of your absence, your contact information, your supervisor’s location (he is obviously not at the conference with you), your chain-of-command, and your line of work (since you said you were at an IT conference). Here are some things a criminal could do with the information you provided in your out-of-office reply:
Steal your property or harm your family. The recipient of your auto-reply now knows that you are out of town and exactly how long you will be gone. All he or she needs now is your home address and a windowless van.Steal your identity or impersonate you. The information in your auto-reply, such as your supervisor’s name, cell number, and your location, all aid the criminal. An identity thief could use freely available search tools on the Internet to piece together the rest of the information he or she needs to assume your identity. Since you are out of town, it’s apparent your boss won’t easily be able to transfer a call to you. The identity thief could call your boss and use a work-related pretext or social engineering attack to gather even more sensitive information about you:Identity Thief:”Hi, this is Bob from accounting. I need Joe’s employee ID and Social Security number because of an issue with his timecard.”Joe’s Boss: “Joe’s out of town at a conference. Let me pull that info up for you.”
The best practice is to avoid using the out-of-office auto-reply at all. Skip the auto-reply, call your important customers and family, and let them know how to reach you.  If you feel you must use an auto-reply, be extremely vague in your language. State that you will be “unavailable,” which will provide uncertainty as to whether you are out of town or just in a long (local) meeting. Remove your signature block and avoid providing any personally identifying information.

Follow these useful tips so you don’t return from your IT conference only to find all your belongings have been stolen.Are Out-of-office Auto-reply Emails a Security Risk? originally appeared on About.com Internet / Network Security on Saturday, September 11th, 2010 at 23:08:41.Permalink | Comment | Email this[Lees verder]

Avoid New Spam / Phishing Attacks
There are a couple of new spam / phishing attacks which have been successful at circumventing my Junkmail filter and making it to my Inbox. One is titled ‘Statement Request’ and the other is titled ‘Microsoft has released an update for Microsoft Outlook’ or sometimes ‘Critical Update for Microsoft Outlook’. To me, these are obvious spam or phishing emails that I barely even think about before deleting them and moving on. But, the volume of them that has been hitting my Inbox has led me to examine them in more detail to help you understand how to recognize them as threats and avoid becoming a victim.’Statement Request’ spam’Microsoft has released an update for Microsoft Outlook’ spamAvoid New Spam / Phishing Attacks originally appeared on About.com Internet / Network Security on Wednesday, June 24th, 2009 at 09:32:07.Permalink | Comment | Email this[Lees verder]

Microsoft Releases Beta of New Security Software
Microsoft announced last November that they planned to discontinue their retail Windows Live OneCare security product and replace it with a new free antimalware offering. That time has come. Well, its coming soon. Microsoft just released the Beta of their new Microsoft Security Essentials software.
Aimed at the consumer market, Microsoft Security Essentials leverages the research and resources of the Microsoft Malware Protection Center to identify and block viruses, spyware, and other malicious threats in real-time. It does not replace some of the other functionality of Windows Live OneCare such as defragmenting hard drives or backing up data, but it promises industry leading malware protection at a price that is hard to ignore in this economy- free.
You can get a copy of the Beta version by visiting the Microsoft Security Essentials site. I have downloaded my copy and will post a review of the product in the coming weeks. Microsoft Releases Beta of New Security Software originally appeared on About.com Internet / Network Security on Wednesday, June 24th, 2009 at 01:55:39.Permalink | Comment | Email this[Lees verder]

iPhone 3.0 Filled with Security Updates
Do you have an iPhone? Have you downloaded version 3.0 of the iPhone OS (the real thing- not the leaked pirated version with the malware)? I mentioned in the comments to my post earlier this week about the leaked iPhone 3.0 scam that I didn’t really understand what the rush was. It seemed like everyone *had* to have the update at precisely 1pm eastern. Not having an iPhone, I couldn’t figure out why you couldn’t wait an hour, or a day, or whatever and just download the update when it is convenient.
But, now it has been a few days and it seems safe to say that if you have an iPhone you probably should have acquired the 3.0 update by now. If the copy & paste feature isn’t a compelling enough reason, consider that there are almost 50 security updates included in version 3.0. The security updates apply to a broad range of features and functions of the iPhone. Its a virtual guarantee that at least some of them will have some relevance to you. iPhone 3.0 Filled with Security Updates originally appeared on About.com Internet / Network Security on Friday, June 19th, 2009 at 10:35:12.Permalink | Comment | Email this[Lees verder]

Asus + Disney + Toys R Us = Kid-Safe Netbook
Asus and Disney are teaming up to create the Disney Netpal. The Disney Netpal will be available in two models- the MK90 with a 16Gb solid state drive, and the MK90H with a 160Gb hard drive- and will only be available from Toys R Us and Amazon.com for a suggested retail price of $349.99. Both models will come in either ‘Princess Pink’ or ‘Magic Blue’, following the stereotypical gender color coding. The target market for the Disney Netpal is boys and girls age 6 to 12.
The next logical question is ‘why would I spend $100 more than a comparable netbook that isn’t branded by Disney?’. The answer is that Asus and Disney have worked to make the netbook safer for kids. First, it has a reinforced case and design to make it more ‘kid-proof’ from a physical perspective. Second, it is designed with a unique Disney user interface (built on Windows XP) with more than 40 parental control options.
According to this ZDNet article, “the systemÂ’s Disney browser is preloaded with numerous kid-friendly Disney websites for kids to explore, and the 2D “gadget tray” (think Windows taskbar, or OS X dock) displays visual icons for easy access to applications. ThereÂ’s also a collection of 15 widgets, including a stopwatch, a digital memo pad and a calculator.”| Follow me on Twitter| Newsletter Signup| Netsecurity Forum|Asus + Disney + Toys R Us = Kid-Safe Netbook originally appeared on About.com Internet / Network Security on Wednesday, June 17th, 2009 at 09:33:11.Permalink | Comment | Email this[Lees verder]

Leaked iPhone 3.0 Scam
Ain’t nothing like the real thing baby. And, since the real thing is officially released today do yourself a favor and don’t fall for any messages claiming to lead to a leaked download of the latest iPhone update.
Apple is releasing the iPhone 3.0 update today which adds copy & paste functionality and some other features to the popular mobile device. Scammers have started a multi-pronged attack involving Twitter, file sharing services, and affiliate marketing schemes capitalizing on the popularity of the iPhone and the excitement about the 3.0 release of the iPhone OS. | Follow me on Twitter| Newsletter Signup| Netsecurity Forum|Leaked iPhone 3.0 Scam originally appeared on About.com Internet / Network Security on Wednesday, June 17th, 2009 at 08:14:33.Permalink | Comment | Email this[Lees verder]

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