Listening Booth: 1970

Listening Booth: 1970
On this set of covers of 1970 hits, Marc Cohn tracks a cataclysmic year for rock: The Beatles have broken up (Lennon's "Look at Me," McCartney's "Maybe I'm Amazed"), Simon and Garfunkel are breaking up ("The Only Living Boy in New York") and Sixties hopes were dashed at Altamont (the …[Lees verder]

Between the Sounds
With the deaths of Big Star's Alex Chilton and Andy Hummel, it's been a bad year for fans of Seventies power pop. Some small good news: this taut 10-song debut. Leader Josh Lattanzi has played with Fountains of Wayne's Adam Schlesinger and toured with the Lemonheads' Evan Dando, and he …[Lees verder]

King of the Beach
It's telling that Nathan Williams, a.k.a. Wavves, is a poor speller. His hazy California pop punk is all about skipping school and riding your bong to the ocean. On the third Wavves full-length, a one-man bedroom experiment blossoms into a real band, with Jay Reatard's feisty backing duo and Modest …[Lees verder]

Pigeons
Here We Go Magic began as a dreamy bedroom chamber-folk experiment, but on their second release, leader Luke Temple emerges with a full-on band, unfurling rich harmonies and sharp-elbowed melodies over Peter Hale's antsy, inventive drumming. The tunes are less straightforwardly catchy than before, woozy waltz "Bottom Feeder" notwithstanding. But …[Lees verder]

An Airplane Carried Me to Bed
"I was 22, alone with nothing to do," sings Adam Young on "I Live Alone." That's roughly the story of Sky Sailing, which preceded his other one-man band, the multiplatinum Owl City. The latter resembled the Postal Service, and this set, mostly completed in 2007, recalls Ben Gibbard's other band, …[Lees verder]

It’ll Be Better
Francis Farewell Starlite is a smart 28-year-old songwriter in love with Eighties R&B at its slickest, whitest and oddest – he sings a little like Peter Gabriel and mixes cutting jazz-piano chords and clever pop constructions like Steely Dan. That sensibility has earned him production work with Drake, and on …[Lees verder]

Symphonicities
Who would have guessed that Sting's most exciting album in years would be a set of orchestral remakes? Symphonicities rocks hard from the outset, with a wallop of cellos and violins replacing the staccato guitars of the early Police song "Next to You." The most inspired moments are the whimsical …[Lees verder]

Croweology
The last time the Black Crowes went on hiatus, in 2002, they had good reason: Their previous album, Lions, was the closest they'd come to being dull: solid songs like the howling electric church of "Soul Singing" muffled by indifferent execution. The Crowes plan to split again, indefinitely, at the …[Lees verder]

5
A group of self-proclaimed "zef" (i.e., white trash) South Africans who rap in English and Afrikaans over rave-style beats? Turns out, that's just what hip-hop needed. Die Antwoord's "Enter the Ninja" video went viral in February, introducing the world to Ninja, the group's glowering lead MC, and Yo-Landi Vi$$er, a …[Lees verder]

Lazers Never Die
White-beat pirates can come home from Jamaica with riddim realness, or sand in their shorts. Producers Diplo and Switch, a.k.a. Major Lazer, definitely do JA right. Recorded at Kingston's legendary Tuff Gong studios, this EP twists dancehall and dubstep into kinky new directions. M.I.A. gets militant on "Sound of Siren," …[Lees verder]

Listening Booth: 1970
On this set of covers of 1970 hits, Marc Cohn tracks a cataclysmic year for rock: The Beatles have broken up (Lennon's "Look at Me," McCartney's "Maybe I'm Amazed"), Simon and Garfunkel are breaking up ("The Only Living Boy in New York") and Sixties hopes were dashed at Altamont (the …[Lees verder]

Between the Sounds
With the deaths of Big Star's Alex Chilton and Andy Hummel, it's been a bad year for fans of Seventies power pop. Some small good news: this taut 10-song debut. Leader Josh Lattanzi has played with Fountains of Wayne's Adam Schlesinger and toured with the Lemonheads' Evan Dando, and he …[Lees verder]

King of the Beach
It's telling that Nathan Williams, a.k.a. Wavves, is a poor speller. His hazy California pop punk is all about skipping school and riding your bong to the ocean. On the third Wavves full-length, a one-man bedroom experiment blossoms into a real band, with Jay Reatard's feisty backing duo and Modest …[Lees verder]

Pigeons
Here We Go Magic began as a dreamy bedroom chamber-folk experiment, but on their second release, leader Luke Temple emerges with a full-on band, unfurling rich harmonies and sharp-elbowed melodies over Peter Hale's antsy, inventive drumming. The tunes are less straightforwardly catchy than before, woozy waltz "Bottom Feeder" notwithstanding. But …[Lees verder]

An Airplane Carried Me to Bed
"I was 22, alone with nothing to do," sings Adam Young on "I Live Alone." That's roughly the story of Sky Sailing, which preceded his other one-man band, the multiplatinum Owl City. The latter resembled the Postal Service, and this set, mostly completed in 2007, recalls Ben Gibbard's other band, …[Lees verder]

It’ll Be Better
Francis Farewell Starlite is a smart 28-year-old songwriter in love with Eighties R&B at its slickest, whitest and oddest – he sings a little like Peter Gabriel and mixes cutting jazz-piano chords and clever pop constructions like Steely Dan. That sensibility has earned him production work with Drake, and on …[Lees verder]

Symphonicities
Who would have guessed that Sting's most exciting album in years would be a set of orchestral remakes? Symphonicities rocks hard from the outset, with a wallop of cellos and violins replacing the staccato guitars of the early Police song "Next to You." The most inspired moments are the whimsical …[Lees verder]

Croweology
The last time the Black Crowes went on hiatus, in 2002, they had good reason: Their previous album, Lions, was the closest they'd come to being dull: solid songs like the howling electric church of "Soul Singing" muffled by indifferent execution. The Crowes plan to split again, indefinitely, at the …[Lees verder]

5
A group of self-proclaimed "zef" (i.e., white trash) South Africans who rap in English and Afrikaans over rave-style beats? Turns out, that's just what hip-hop needed. Die Antwoord's "Enter the Ninja" video went viral in February, introducing the world to Ninja, the group's glowering lead MC, and Yo-Landi Vi$$er, a …[Lees verder]

Lazers Never Die
White-beat pirates can come home from Jamaica with riddim realness, or sand in their shorts. Producers Diplo and Switch, a.k.a. Major Lazer, definitely do JA right. Recorded at Kingston's legendary Tuff Gong studios, this EP twists dancehall and dubstep into kinky new directions. M.I.A. gets militant on "Sound of Siren," …[Lees verder]