Borat: Cultural Learnings of America for Make Benefit Glorious Nation of Kazakhs

Borat: Cultural Learnings of America for Make Benefit Glorious Nation of Kazakhstan
Jagshemash! “Borat” is a riotous, highly offensive gem of a movie that is a fish our of water tale of a Kazakhi journalist’s journey to America and his subsequent obsession with former “Baywatch” beauty Pam Anderson.[Lees verder]

The Departed
“The Departed” isn’t Scorsese’s best or most ambitious work, but it uses a unique approach to expand on the original movie’s clever double agent premise. [Lees verder]

Little Children
Todd Field’s second feature is a rich, textured character piece that maintains the quirkiness of the original novel, but loses a bit in its oddly slow pacing.[Lees verder]

The Texas Chainsaw Massacre: The Beginning
Actually a better remake than the previous “Chainsaw,””The Beginning” is enjoyable enough but doesn’t really live up to its billing and often suffers from a lack of Leatherface. All in all though, not bad.[Lees verder]

The Queen
The perfect combination of historical extrapolation and subversive political commentary, “The Queen” sheds a new light on the British monarchy and the government. Helen Mirren and the rest of Stephen Frears’ fabulous cast make you feel as if you’re watching real events transpire. [Lees verder]

The Guardian
The individual parts work fine, but they don’t add up to anything.[Lees verder]

Open Season
A twisted sense of humor and a strong voice cast make Open Season fun for kids and adults. It’s a great start for Sony’s animation studio.[Lees verder]

School for Scoundrels
“School for Scoundrels” has some solid opportunities for real dark comedy, but blows most of them for maudlin romantic-comedy tripe, and the ones it does go for it never takes far enough. It’s not bad, but it could have been better.[Lees verder]

The Last King of Scotland
With a masterfully-skewed twist on “A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court”, this historical biopic is notable not only for Forest Whitaker’s amazing portrayal of Idi Amin, but also for the brilliant writing and an impressive performance by James McAvoy. [Lees verder]

All the King’s Men
There’s a good movie in there – in fact it we’ve seen it before, in 1949 – but Zaillian’s muddied storytelling and lack of focus hides it beyond recall. It’s Oscar bait, pure and simple, of the kind Hollywood loves, and it’s just as heavy-handed as that sounds. What a waste.[Lees verder]

Borat: Cultural Learnings of America for Make Benefit Glorious Nation of Kazakhstan
Jagshemash! “Borat” is a riotous, highly offensive gem of a movie that is a fish our of water tale of a Kazakhi journalist’s journey to America and his subsequent obsession with former “Baywatch” beauty Pam Anderson.[Lees verder]

The Departed
“The Departed” isn’t Scorsese’s best or most ambitious work, but it uses a unique approach to expand on the original movie’s clever double agent premise. [Lees verder]

Little Children
Todd Field’s second feature is a rich, textured character piece that maintains the quirkiness of the original novel, but loses a bit in its oddly slow pacing.[Lees verder]

The Texas Chainsaw Massacre: The Beginning
Actually a better remake than the previous “Chainsaw,””The Beginning” is enjoyable enough but doesn’t really live up to its billing and often suffers from a lack of Leatherface. All in all though, not bad.[Lees verder]

The Queen
The perfect combination of historical extrapolation and subversive political commentary, “The Queen” sheds a new light on the British monarchy and the government. Helen Mirren and the rest of Stephen Frears’ fabulous cast make you feel as if you’re watching real events transpire. [Lees verder]

The Guardian
The individual parts work fine, but they don’t add up to anything.[Lees verder]

Open Season
A twisted sense of humor and a strong voice cast make Open Season fun for kids and adults. It’s a great start for Sony’s animation studio.[Lees verder]

School for Scoundrels
“School for Scoundrels” has some solid opportunities for real dark comedy, but blows most of them for maudlin romantic-comedy tripe, and the ones it does go for it never takes far enough. It’s not bad, but it could have been better.[Lees verder]

The Last King of Scotland
With a masterfully-skewed twist on “A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court”, this historical biopic is notable not only for Forest Whitaker’s amazing portrayal of Idi Amin, but also for the brilliant writing and an impressive performance by James McAvoy. [Lees verder]

All the King’s Men
There’s a good movie in there – in fact it we’ve seen it before, in 1949 – but Zaillian’s muddied storytelling and lack of focus hides it beyond recall. It’s Oscar bait, pure and simple, of the kind Hollywood loves, and it’s just as heavy-handed as that sounds. What a waste.[Lees verder]

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